Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) : Definition, Etiology, Clinical features, Differential diagnosis & Rx of NUG

September 12, 2011 | By | Reply More

Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) : Definition, Etiology, Clinical features, Differential diagnosis & Rx of NUG

Definition: Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis is a relatively rare specific infectious gingival disease of young persons.

Etiology:

1.Specific causes-

  •  Fusobacterium nucleatum,
  • Treponema vincentii, and
  • Probably other bacteria play an important role.

2.Predisposing factors are-

  • Emotional stress,
  • Smoking,
  • Poor oral hygiene,
  • Local trauma
  •  Mainly HIV infection.

Clinical features:

  • The characteristic clinical feature is painful necrosis of the interdental papillae and the gingival margins, and the formation of craters covered with a gray pseudomembrane . Spontaneous gingival bleeding, halitosis, and intense salivation are common.
  • Fever, malaise, and lymphadenopathy are less common.
  • Rarely, the lesions may extend beyond the gingiva (necrotizing ulcerative stomatitis).
  • The diagnosis is made at the clinical level.

Differential diagnosis:

  • Herpetic gingivitis,
  • desquamative gingivitis,
  • agranulocytosis,
  • leukemia,
  • scurvy,
  • noma.

Treatment: Systemic metronidazole and oxygen-releasing agents topically are the best therapy in the acute phase, followed by a mechanical gingival treatment.

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Category: Dental, Oral Pathology, Periodontology

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