Normal Pigmentation: Definition, Etiology, Clinical features, Differential diagnosis, Treatment

September 20, 2011 | By | Reply More

Normal Pigmentation: Definition, Etiology, Clinical features, Differential diagnosis, Treatment

Definition and etiology: Increased melanin production and deposition in the oral mucosa may often be a physiological finding, particularly in dark-skinned individuals.

Clinical features:

  • This type of pigmentation is persistent and symmetrical
  • Clinically presents as asymptomatic black or brown areas of varying size.
  • The gingiva is most commonly affected, followed by the buccal mucosa, palate, and lips.
  • The pigmentation is more prominent in areas of pressure or friction, and usually becomes more intense with increasing age.

Laboratory tests: Histopathological examination.

Differential diagnosis:

  • Addison disease,
  • Smoker’s melanosis,
  • Drug-induced pigmentation,
  • Pigmented nevi,
  • Melanoma,
  • Amalgam tattoo.

Treatment: No treatment is required.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Category: Dental, Oral Pathology

WARNING: Any unauthorised use or reproduction of  www.neuronarc.com content for commercial or any purposes is strictly prohibited and constitutes copyright infringement liable to legal action.